How to install FFMPEG, Libx264, LibRTMP, LibAACPlus, LibVPX on the Raspberry Pi (Debian “Wheezy” ARMHF)

In the past I’ve had to been required to install FFMPEG for applications such as Serviio or a website like Clipbucket. It can be quite stressful since you could get dependency issues if you tried reading any other tutorials online, since the worst nightmare is if something breaks when you have compiled software using wrong dependencies. But this tutorial should ensure that it’ll work first time.

Optional “Libfaac”

If you are installing ffmpeg on your raspberry pi for use with ClipBucket, then please scroll down to find the optional library you can compile, along with the rest of the other libraries, called “libfaac” which you will need in order for video conversions for later versions of ClipBucket to work.

Note: This is experimental and you may receive “illegal instruction” somewhere when the video is converting in the logs. I’m not sure why however ffmpeg still works for other conversions.

Removing any existing dependencies

It’s vital to uninstall everything we’re going to be compiling/installing just in case there have been custom compilations of software that might be corrupted or broken. I’ve had a few errors in the past which resulted in “Illegal Instruction” when executing “ffmpeg” in the terminal.

Just copy and paste this into your terminal and hit enter. Type y and hit enter when necessary.

Downloading the Dependencies

Copy and Paste the commands below. When it asks, type and press Enter. This will download and install everything we need for later on.

Downloading & Compiling FFMPEG AND It’s Modules

Before we get started, we will be working inside a folder within the home directory. It is important not to remove this file in-case you want to uninstall anything later. Type the commands below in order and follow through.

Downloading & Compiling LibaacPlus

Again, type the below commands in order, and then move onto the next step.

Downloading & Compiling Libx264

 Downloading & Compiling LibVPX

NOTE: if you see the command output for “./configure” incorrectly identify the Pi as ArmV7 instead of ArmV6, try running the configure command again with the following parameter;

Downloading & Compiling LibRTMP

Now, before we move on, it’s important to run the command

This will update the system and make it aware of the new packages which have been installed.

Optional – Libfaac

Note: If you do not require Libfaac for anything, then please SKIP this section. If you’re unsure, then skip it anyway. It’s experimental and may break your ffmpeg.

When you’re in the nana editor, you will need to go to line 126. Once you’re at that line, make the below code the same as in the file…

Once you’re finished, press CTRL + O to save, and then hit enter, then press CTRL + X to close the editor.

Then carry on…

It’s important to do a reboot just to make sure everything is being recognised and found.

Downloading & Compiling FFMPEG (Latest Version)

NOTE: This took my Raspberry Pi (Model B) around ~2 hours when overclocked to “Turbo” – 1GHz.

Finishing up

Now that FFMPEG has been compiled and installed successfully, we will need to reboot to make sure that everything is working. Type in;

When the Pi boots up, type in “ffmpeg” and you should see an output similar to that of what I get below;

And that’s it! You have now successfully installed FFMPEG on your Raspberry Pi! 🙂

Summary

The Raspberry Pi is a small credit-card sized computer. It’s very low powered and can be powered by a mini-usb cable and USB plug, such as a modern day phone charger. The Raspberry Pi (Model B) has a stock 700Mhz Armv6 processor and 512MB of RAM. The processor can be overclocked in the configuration to a maximum of 1Ghz (WARNING – Overclocking the Pi may void your warranty and break it).

When software utilises FFMPEG, you will see that it may bring the processor usage to 100% on the pi. This will cause the SoC to heat up rapidly unless you have a heatsink or some other form of cooling. At 100% CPU utilisation, the temperature without a heatsink can reach up to 80 Degrees Celsius!

Feel free to comment below and ask any questions!

Like this tutorial? Please consider a small donation to get more tutorials and help with configuring and setting up your Raspberry Pi – As well as keeping this blog alive;

Bitcoin Address: 1FfcZsAKZLivLLT5jAu6Jr3vCmp9aNtoqF

How to run Boinc & BoincTUI on the Raspberry Pi

Before we start, I would like to take this time to explain what BOINC actually is.

What is BOINC?

BOINC is an open-source piece of software that allows users to volunteer their computers idle time to carry out scientific research. This in turn is called Grid-Computing. In other words, you can register to become part of a project which uses your computers’ idle time to search for new cures for diseases or help gain a better understanding of our galaxy. There are plenty of research projects available which you can find here.

Installing BOINC on the Raspberry Pi

In order to install BOINC on the Raspberry Pi, you will need to make sure that you have enough space on the SDCard. Other than that, you can go ahead and install it by typing in…

This will install BOINC and the GUI if you want to Remote Desktop (presuming its headless) into the Pi and check up on your projects instead of using the text interface.

Installing BOINCTUI on the Raspberry Pi

This was a little frustrating at first, however I managed to get help on the Raspberry Pi forums from a user named ghans.

Start off by navigating to the home directory by typing in cd ~/. Then type in the following to download the source code into the folder “boinctui” – presuming you have subversion installed. If not, then type in

Download source code –

After the source code has downloaded, cd into the directory by typing in “cd boinctui” – without the quotes.

Then follow, in order, the commands listed;

The compiling took me about 20 minutes give or take with my Pi over-clocked @ 1GHz.

NOTE: If you get any errors about missing libraries when running ./configure, you may need to run the following commands;

Once it’s finished, type in boinctui to load the Text-Based Interface and ta-da!. You can now manage your boinc-client with ease.

It’s been a while

It’s been a while since I last wrote a blog post. I thought I’ll just give you all a quick update as to what is going on right now.

In September I started college studying Electrical/Electronic Engineering at Level 3. It’s been over a month since then and I’m really enjoying it. Never the less, I still continue on with my projects at home. A few days after enrolment day, I mounted a 100W solar panel on my roof. This connects to a solar charge controller which controls the voltage/current going to the battery. Right now I only have one single leisure battery and require more for my project to be completed. My aim is to completely run this room from solar. I only ever use the light, computer, and my home server which is planned to stay on 24/7. In total the wattage adds up too… 600W(pc) + 250W(home server) + 25W(light) = 875W. Currently, the system powers the room light and my phone charger.

Right now I’m seeking a job in order to complete this project.

This Single Molecule Drives Cancer Cells to Suicide

biologyA team of researchers has identified a single molecule, called TIC10, that kick-starts the body’s tumor-destroying systems—causing a chain reaction that can kill cancer dead.”. “In a series of experiments in mice the researchers, from Pennsylvania State University, found that TIC10 activities the gene for a protein called TRAIL—that’s short for tumour-necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand—which causes cancerous cells to commit suicide.”

Read the full article here.

US Military installing Laser turrets on combat airplanes

laser_turret_wire2.jpg7fc930b2-07db-467d-bf77-6dcfa968ad88LargeWell, could this be the future? I’ve researched laser beam weapons before being used on military aircraft carriers as a means of taking down drones or UAV’s or missiles… But to think that this might actually be the start of the energy weapons phase; leaving behind bullets as “old fashioned” and using directed energy beam weapons as a more powerful and efficient weapon against threats.

Read more here.

View the Earth in HD

download“Canadian company plans to one-up Google Earth by streaming video footage straight from the International Space Station to the web with a top time delay of just a few hours.”

EDIT:
Sorry, there was a mistake here. They will be streaming sometime in summer. Keep checking here for any latest news until then!

“Urthecastis due to begin beaming the view from the ISS by autumn 2013 — the equipment will be finished by the summer, then shipped to Russia and sent to the space station via two Soyuz rockets. Once there, the Russian space agency will install it beneath the ISS and downlink the data to Earth where it will be published.”

Check their website here.